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(UK) School fails to provide autistic student "a setting to manage his autism";

Oct 26, 2018, Guardian: The special needs education crisis is here. I know from my autistic son https://www.theguardian.com/commentisfree/2018/oct/26/education-system-failing-autistic-son-school-crisis …Two Guardian reports have highlighted the looming Send crisis our children are facing in school. I can tell you that crisis is already here. My seven-year-old son has autistic spectrum disorder (ASD), with the added complication that he also has a diagnosis of pathological demand avoidance (PDA) – complicated because, although it’s under the umbrella of ASD, it isn’t recognised by most health authorities, and the condition – though on the autism spectrum – requires techniques very different from classic autism to manage it. In a nutshell, while my son is very bright, he has a host of complex needs that manifest as anxiety, which in turn presents in violence and aggression, meaning that he finds mainstream school impossible. He has just started in Year 3 at our local junior school and I have been fighting to get him what he has been legally entitled to since he began formal schooling. When we – I must add that I can’t fault my son’s school, it has been completely supportive – first applied to get him an education health and care plan (EHCP), it was rejected. His condition wasn’t even considered severe enough to warrant an assessment. This is a child who has such extreme sensory needs that he goes into meltdown if there is too much noise, too much light, too many people in his personal space – all problematic in a mainstream school. We fought this decision and eventually he was assessed by an educational psychologist who decided his needs warranted a full-time, one-to-one learning support assistant (LSA). Quite a leap from saying he didn’t need assessing at all. My son’s EHCP was finalised at the end of Year 2 – two and a half years after we started the process…. … He could no longer stand to be in the classroom because of the noise, smells and general busyness. He began to hit out – at other children, teachers, the head – because of his distress. His violent and challenging behaviours at home became worse than I’d ever known. He attacked his younger sister regularly. He began attacking me, which was completely new. I was bitten, punched, kicked, scratched, sworn at and – on one horrible occasion – strangled. He began making threats to harm himself, even attempting to climb out of his bedroom window. It was horrifying to see him in such distress…. … Or the children in his class who are afraid of him because of his violent outbursts. It’s not just the Send child who is being failed by the funding crisis, it’s every individual they encounter during their highly stressful day in a setting that can’t cater for their needs. … … My son doesn’t have mental-health needs. He is autistic and needs a setting that can help him manage his autism. …