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UK: Neurodiversity: "More needs to be done in schools"

Oct 13, 2022, Newswire: New research calls for a greater understanding of neurodiversity in schools as generational knowledge gap emerge https://www.einnews.com/pr_news/595709500/new-research-calls-for-a-greater-understanding-of-neurodiversity-in-schools-as-generational-knowledge-gap-emerges

Clearly there is a lot more to be done to educate the nation as a whole about what it means to be neurodiverse, as well as how to remove barriers in the classroom and workplace” — Robert Hendricks

As millions of children and young adults embark on the new academic year, healthcare experts are appealing for a greater understanding of neurodiversity after a report, released today, revealed a clear knowledge gap - especially amongst older generations. As an innovator in health solutions for cognition, SFI Health surveyed 2,000 people between 16 and 65 years old to determine how people feel about neurodiversity.

It was discovered that over three quarters (77%) of the UK population as a whole were unclear about what it actually meant, despite nine million people being estimated to be neurodivergent. In contrast, half (47%) of 16-24 year olds were familiar with the concept of neurodiversity and two thirds (64%) of young adults in that age category either identified as neurodiverse themselves or knew somebody that was. Less than a third (31%) of adults aged 45 to 54 claimed to know someone with a neurodivergent condition or had been diagnosed as neurodiverse themselves by a clinician. A movement that recognises the wide spectrum of human behaviour and promotes people’s differences positively, neurodiversity is commonly used to describe people diagnosed with dyslexia, autism, attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD), dysgraphia and dyscalculia. It is estimated that 15% of the UK population are neurodivergent and 20% globally. According to the research it is Gen Zs who are leading the way in championing those with a neurodiverse condition as a clear generational age gap emerged throughout the data. Around three quarters of people aged 16-24 believe that more needs to be done in schools (78%) and workplaces (75%) to support the neurodiverse, compared with around half of those aged 45 to 54…. “Clearly there is a lot more to be done to educate the nation as a whole about what it means to be neurodiverse, as well as how to remove barriers in the classroom and workplace. “Whilst it appears that the younger generations are further ahead with their knowledge, understanding and empathy of people with these conditions, there is a widespread appetite to gain a deeper understanding of what it means to be neurodivergent, as well learning more about their unique skills and attributes and how best to support them in an education and workplace setting. “Alongside the use of new technology, helping children to develop confidence and understand their strengths were key areas in which people believe schools should be supporting their neurodivergent students. With the academic year now in full swing across education settings in the UK, this is a crucial time to raise awareness and support pupils of all abilities….


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