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(UK) Bromley: Council to pay parent $4.4K; special needs students had no school 8 mos.

Aug 6, 2022, London News: Bromley council told to pay dad £3.6K after son with special needs missed eight months of school https://londonnewsonline.co.uk/bromley-council-told-to-pay-dad-3-6k-after-son-with-special-needs-missed-8-months-of-school/

Part of London

Bromley council has been ordered to pay a dad £3,600 [$4.400] after his son with special needs missed out on full-time education and support for several months.

The man claimed he had to take time off work as he was distressed about the lack of support for his son.

The unnamed dad, referred to only as Mr X in the Local Government Ombudsman report, said the lack of support had a “significant impact” on his family and his son’s anxiety.

The probe found the council didn’t arrange alternative education for Mr X’s son, named S in the report, between June 2021 and February 2022….

The council first knew S wasn’t accessing full-time education in June 2021. Mr X and the school had agreed to put S on a temporary part-time timeable the month before as he wasn’t managing full days.

The school arranged a review of S’s plan in June as the part-time timetable wasn’t “having the effect on S the school and he hoped for”, according to the report.

At the review in July 2021, the school and Mr X agreed that S needed to change school. The ombudsman found the council failed to arrange any alternative education for S until February 2022. S stopped attending the school completely in October 2021.

The report also found the council had reason to believe from June 2021 that S wasn’t getting all the provision in his plan and the authority breached its duty to secure that support….

The council must pay Mr X £3,200 for the education and therapy S is likely to have missed between June 2021 and February 2022, £300 to recognise Mr X’s “avoidable distress and uncertainty” and £100 for the “avoidable time and trouble” he was caused by having to complain.

The authority must also review its policy so that it quickly secures alternative provision for children who do not have access to full-time education at school.