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(UK) BBC reports on more children with allergies

Dec 3, 2018, BBC: Why the world is becoming more allergic to food https://www.bbc.com/news/health-46302780 By Dr Alexandra Santos King's College London Around the world, children are far more likely than ever before to develop food allergies. Recent inquiries into the deaths of two British teenagers after eating sesame and peanut highlighted the sometimes tragic consequences. In August, a six-year-old girl in Western Australia died as the result of a dairy allergy. The rise in allergies in recent decades has been particularly noticeable in the West. Food allergy now affects about 7% of children in the UK and 9% of those in Australia, for example. Across Europe, 2% of adults have food allergies. Life-threatening reactions can be prompted even by traces of the trigger foods, meaning patients and families live with fear and anxiety. The dietary restrictions which follow can become a burden to social and family lives. While we can't say for sure why allergy rates are increasing, researchers around the world are working hard to find ways to combat this phenomenon. … The frequency of food allergy has increased over the past 30 years, particularly in industrialised societies. Exactly how great the increase is depends on the food and where the patient lives. For example, there was a five-fold increase in peanut allergies in the UK between 1995 and 2016. A study of 1,300 three-year-olds for the EAT Study at King's College London, suggested that 2.5% now have peanut allergies. Australia has the highest rate of confirmed food allergy. One study found 9% of Australian one-year-olds had an egg allergy, while 3% were allergic to peanuts. The increase in allergies is not simply the effect of society becoming more aware of them and better at diagnosing them. It is thought that allergies and increased sensitivity to foods are probably environmental, and related to Western lifestyles. …