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PBS: Waiting approach means "...80% of [students] with mental health needs fall through the cracks"

Mar 3, 2018, PBS News Hour: Opinion: Schools shouldn’t wait for red flags to address student mental health needs https://www.pbs.org/newshour/nation/opinion-schools-shouldnt-wait-for-red-flags-to-address-student-mental-health-needs By Nathaniel von der Embse, Assistant Professor of School Psychology, University of South Florida. ... Such students can be identified early with considerable accuracy if educators are given the right training and tools. Unfortunately, most schools rely on reactive methods, like office discipline referrals, to figure out which students need behavioral and mental health services. Research shows this approach of waiting until students act out in school is inefficient and leads to as many as 80 percent of those with mental health needs to fall through the cracks. Such concerns have heightened in the wake of the Parkland high school massacre. News reports indicate the alleged shooter exhibited a number of troubling behaviors, raising questions about his mental health status and whether more could have been done to help him sooner. To address the issue of students falling through the cracks, more schools should adopt proactive, universal screening tools.... I developed one such tool – the Social, Academic and Emotional Behavior Risk Screener, or SAEBRS – with the help of several grants, including $1.4 million from the Institute for Educational Sciences in the U.S. Department of Education. … If society is serious about preventing severe mental and behavioral health problems, it must take a critical look at the current state of mental health supports in the nation’s schools. Doing so will bring the value of screening tools into sharper focus. … Consider a typical elementary classroom with 30 students. Approximately 6 students, on average, will have a critical mental and behavioral health problem such as anxiety or aggression, yet less than half will receive timely intervention. Who are those students? Typically those that exhibit more outward types of problems, such as aggression, problems paying attention and disruptive behavior. ... Currently, less than 15 percent of schools engage in some form of behavioral or mental health screening. However, more schools are adopting universal screening. As the developer of a screening tool, I have seen rapid adoption of the tool over the last four years from two elementary schools in rural North Carolina to hundreds of schools across 28 states. As schools consider how best to meet the behavioral and mental health needs of their students, screening can provide crucial information to guide the way.